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What are the Medical Allowances for Being Induced?

By: Rachel Newcombe - Updated: 11 Aug 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Labour Pregnancy Induce Induced Midwife

Q.I am 36 weeks pregnant with my second child and I am really struggling with this pregnancy. I can't sleep, have really bad back pain and it really hurts to pick my son up.

I feel at an all time low and I am really stressed and just cry all the time, is there any way of getting the hospital to induce my labour?

(Miss Nikita Nuttall, 10 December 2008)

A.

Sorry to hear you’re not having a pleasant time with the final weeks of your pregnancy.

Labour normally occurs between 39 and 41 weeks of pregnancy. When labour is induced, it means it’s started by artificial means, rather than nature taking its course. Women are induced for various reasons and there are medial issues and allowances that require the need for labour to be induced. For example, if you have diabetes, your baby is overdue by 10 days to two weeks over your due date, if you have previously had a stillborn baby or have a chronic or acute illness that is likely to threaten either your health or the health of your baby, then it’s likely your baby will be induced.

In your situation, it would be advisable to speak to your midwife as soon as possible to discuss your concerns, as they’ll be in the best position to be able to help you. It will be up to them whether or not they think you could have your baby induced and will depend on how your current health situation is and whether there’s a possibility your health, or the health of your baby, could be at risk.

Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that they will decide to induce your baby, but it is a possibility. Some women do suffer badly from the symptoms you describe towards the end of their pregnancy and it can be very unpleasant.

If you’re not able to have your baby induced, then it sounds like you may benefit from having some extra help at home, for example with looking after your son, so you can take it easy and try and ease the stress you’re under. Although you’re finding it difficult to sleep, it would be helpful if you could try and get as much rest as possible during this time. Perhaps you could try napping in a chair if it would be comfier than lying down in bed or try sitting on a birthing ball to relieve the strain on your back.

Above all, try and remember that you only have a few weeks left until your baby is born. Although it’s hard to keep going when you feel so low, try and stay focused and strong and know that the end to your suffering is in sight.

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